Running the Latest .NET Core SDK on Visual Studio Team Services Hosted Build Agent

Depending on your project, you might need to run the latest version of the .NET Core SDK on your hosted build agent. Hosted agents are pulled from the VSTS hosted pool. With great flexibility comes great responsibility, so the build agent has some limitations when it comes to picking the software that needs to be deployed.

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Creating a Content Validation Bot for GitHub

As we released the Visual F# documentation as open-source, one thing stood out as a challenge that needed to be tackled – content validation. There could be several things we could do, such as integrating extra validation rules in the build system or building a GitHub bot. I thought that as a learning experience, I will go the bot route. This post explains how I worked this problem.

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What makes a PM a great PM?

Written to the tune of:

Before going any further into this post, I should preface this by saying that anything and everything below is purely my subjective view on what makes a Program Manager a great Program Manager. I consider myself lucky enough to have experienced what it’s like to be a PM on a product team, and currently – on a content team, and this blog post is a reflection of my experiences across the two completely different organizations.

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Command line and vso-agent

Written to the tune of:

A while ago Microsoft released this wonderful thing called the VSO agent – a cross-platform build agent that you can set up on MacOS X and/or Linux and hook it directly to a VSO or TFS instance to handle automated builds with a lot of customization options. You can get it here.

So here comes the challenge – more often than not, the build agent should be automatically set up, but the documentation mentions that the instance details, such as the service URL, username and password are manually entered. Not exactly what you want to do in an automated scenario. The good news is that there is a (not so) secret option to use command line parameters for the vso-agent:

node agent/vsoagent.js --u YOUR_USERNAME --p VSO_ONE_USE_TOKEN --s https://VSO_URL.visualstudio.com --a AGENT_NAME --l AGENT_POOL_CAN_BE_DEFAULT

Voila! All of a sudden, you can include this in your deployment scripts.